REVISED: 4/6/09

North American

1928: North American Aviation Co. 1930: Absorbed Berliner-Joyce Aircraft Corp. 1933: Acquired General Aviation Mfg Corp, Baltimore MD; Berliner-Joyce dissolved. 1935: North American Aviation, Inglewood and Downey CA. 1948: Design rights and tooling to NAvion sold to Ryan Corp. 1967: Merged with Rockwell-Standard as North American Rockwell Corp. 1973: Merged as Rockwell Intl with Rockwell Mfg Co, largely out of the aerospace business. 1981: Los Angeles plant sold to Northrop. 1983: Rights to Sabreliner Div of Rockwell Intl acquired by St Louis investment group and renamed Sabreliner Corp, Perryville MO (qv).

 About the company

A-2 - Redesignation from AJ-1 (qv).
A-5 SEE A3J.
A-27 (NA-44, -69, -72) - Export attack-bomber version of BC-1A with 775hp Wright R-1820F; span: 42'0" length: 29'0" load: 1486# v: 250/220/70 range: 800 (575 with ordnance) ceiling: 28,000'. Two .30 nose guns and one flexible .30 in the rear cockpit; ordnance load of four 100# bombs in underwing racks.
  North American A-27 (USAF Museum)

A-27 (NA-69) 1939 = POP: 10 ordered by Siam, but were instead impressed by the Army, redesignated A-27 [41-18890/18899], and assigned to the Philippines, where they were destroyed in Japanese bombings during Dec 1941.

NA-44 1938 = Export. POP: 1 armed prototype to RCAF in 1940.

NA-72 1940 = Export with P&W R-1340. POP: 30 to Brazil.


  North American A-36A (USAF Museum)

A-36 (NA-97) 1942 = 1pClwM rg; 1325hp Allison V-1710; span: 37'0" length: 32'3" load: 1760# v: 310/250/85 range: 550. Ground-attack fighter-bomber version of P-51 had dive brakes that were reportedly wired shut in some combat areas (SEE sidebar). POP: 500 as A-36A, plus some from original P-51 batch. Dubbed Apache by the engineering dept, but unofficially as management was not in favor of Indian names.
  North American XA2J-1 [124439]

A2J 1952 = Turboprop version of AJ with two Allison T40-A-6 and six-blade, contrarotating props; ff: 1/4/52. POP: 2 as XA2J-1 [124439/124440]; one ended up being burned in a fire-fighting demo at Edwards AFB in 1962.
A3J, A-5 Vigilante - All-weather, carrier-based, supersonic fighter-bomber. 2pCmwM rg.
YA3J-1, YA5-A NA-233, -247) 1958 = Two 16150# GE YJ79-GE-2; ff: 8/31/58. POP: 2 [145157/145158]. Became YA5-A in 1962.

  North American A-5A [147856]
  North American A-5A [147858] (NASA Dryden)

A3J-1, A-5A (NA-247, -258, -263, -269, -272) 1960 = Two 17000# J79; span: 53'0" length: 76'6" v: 1385/805/156 range: 985 ceiling: 43,800'. POP: 57 [146694/146702, 147850/147863, 148924/148933, 149276/149299]. Became A-5A.

A3J-2, A-5B (NA-269) 1962 = Additional fuel in humped fuselage-top decking; ff: 4/29/62. POP: 6 [149300/149305]. Became A-5B.

  North American A-5C [156638] (USN)
  North American RA-5C (USN)

A3J-3P, A-5C, RA-5C 1962 = Long-range photo-recon version of A3J-2; two 17860# J79; length: 76'6" load: 42,090# v: 1290/783/154 range: 547 (944 with drop-tanks) ceiling: 48,400'; ff: 6/30/62. Combat radius: 1,500. POP: 55 [149306/149317, 150823/150842, 151615/151634, 151726/151728, 156608/156643], plus 59 converted A-5A and A-5B. Became A-5C/RA-5C in 1962.


Aero Commander SEE Aero Commander, Rockwell
AJ, A-2 Savage - USN's first attack-bomber. 3pChwM rg; two 2300hp P&W R-2800-44W and one 4000# Allison J33-A-19 turbojet (mounted inside fuselage); span: 71'5" length: 63'1" load: 19,323# v: 379 (props only) 466 (at 35,000' with all engines)/270/120 range: 2200 (data for AJ-1). Became A-2 in 1962.
XAJ-1 (NA-146) 1948 = ff: 7/3/48. POP: 3 prototypes with flat horizontal tail [121460, 121462].

  North American AJ-1 (North American)

AJ-1, A-2A (NA-156, -160, -169) 1949 = Dihedral horizontal tail; ff: 5/10/49. POP: 55 [122590/122601, 124157/124186, 124850/124864]; redesignated A-2A.

  North American AJ-2 Civil borate bomber [N101Z] (1971 Aerospace Historian)

AJ-2, A-2B (NA-163, -184) 1953 = Larger fin and fuel tanks, two Pratt & Whitney R-2800-48 and one Allison J33-A-10; ff: 2/18/53. POP: 55 [130405/130421, 134035/134072], with most used as aerial tankers. Redesignated A-2B.

This photo is AJ-2 [130418], probably taken in 1971, possibly at Bridgeport CT. It is wearing markings applied by Avco Lycoming while used an engine test-bed, registered [N68667]. Following its naval use it was used as a fire bomber in Oregon, registered [N101Z], before going to new owners. In 1984 it was flown to the Naval Air Museum at Pensacola and is now on display in USN markings (— Peter Munro 7/5/00).

A British publication from 1965 says AJ Air Tankers of Van Nuys CA converted two as fire fighters after removing the J-33 in the tail, showing one in action with no big prop spinners and a firefighting scheme with a big #88 (— Doug Bastin 7/10/00).

AJ-2P (NA-175, -183) 1952 = Photo-recon with large camera nose, taller fin, zero-dihedral stabilizer; ff: 3/30/52. POP: 30 [128043/128051, 129185/129195, 130422/130425, 134073/134075].

  North American AT-6 Bore-sighting wing guns

AT-6, T-6 Texan - Advanced trainer and utility redesignated from BC-1A and BC-2. Redesignated as T-6 in 1948. USN version SNJ. RCAF and export RAF version as Harvard; . SEE ALSO A-27, P-64, Noorduyn AT-16.
  North American AT-6 on skis

AT-6 (NA-59) 1940 = ff: 2/6/40. POP: 85, plus 9 from BC-1B [40-717/725, -2080/2164].

  North American AT-6A from Mather Field at Moffett Field CA. Note unusual placement of s/n under canopy [41-16087] (William T Larkins)

AT-6A (NA-77) 1941 = 2pClwM rg; 600hp P&W R-1340-49; span: 42'0" length: 29'0" load: 1255# v: 210/145/x range: 630 ceiling: 24,200'. POP: 1,549 [41-148/785, -15824/16228, 16259/16403, -16439/16457, 41-16474/16578, -16616/16653, -16693/16778, -16821/16878, -16924/16939, -16994/17033].

  North American AT-6B Civil over San Francisco [NC62702] (William T Larkins)
  North American AT-6B Gunnery/bombing trainer (North American via John W Darr coll)

AT-6B 1941 NA-84) = Gunnery trainer. POP: 399 [41-17034/17433]; c.100 exports to Colombia.

  North American AT-6C Hamilton AFB 1949 [42-3956 and -43993] (William T Larkins)

AT-6C (NA-88) 1942 = Plywood and low-alloy metals used in construction. POP: 2,970 [41-32073/333819, 42-3884/4243, -43847/44411, -48772/49069, 48-1301/1368]; 14 exports to Colombia.

  North American AT-6D [42-85352] (USAAF)

AT-6D (NA-88, -119, -121) 1942 = 24v system. POP: 4,388 [41-33820/34672, 42-44412/44746, -84163/86562, 44-80845/81644], included 675 to USN as SNJand numerous Lend-Lease exports including 38 to Colombia.

  North American XAT-6E (USAAF)

XAT-6E 1943 = AT-6D refitted with high-altitude Ranger V-770. POP: 1 [42-84241], later in civil registry as [NX74108]. Disposition unknown, but a replica, converted from SNJ-5, was under construction recently as static display at Western Museum of Flight (CA).

AT-6F (NA-121) 1944 = POP: 956 [44-81645/82600], of which 931 to USN as SNJ.

T-6D (NA-168) 1949 = Modernization program implemented to upgrade 2,068 AT-6s for post-war service; new cockpit layout, new prop and tail wheel, larger fuel tanks. All were assigned new s/ns [49-2722/2756].

  North American T-6G [44-1279](?) (USAF Museum)

T-6G (NA-168, -182, -188, -195, -197) 1950 = Remanufactured AT-6; length: 29'6" range: 770. $27,000; POP: 1,743 [49-2897/3537, 50-1277/1326, 51-14314/15237, -16071/16077, -17354/17364, 52-8197/8246, 53-4555/4614, 12 others probably in the T-6D batch].

LT-6G (NA-168) 1950 = Army observer. POP: 59 [49-3538/3596].
T-6H - Temporary designation for T-6G conversions from AT-6F.

T-6J (NA-186) (Canada) 1952 = POP: 285 [51-17089/17231, 52-8493/8612, 53-4615/4636].

The aircraft was built from plans provided by NAA to Canadian Car & Foundry in Port William, Ontario. All were built as Harvard 4s with s/ns preceded by a "CCF-4" and none ever received NAA s/ns, which would have been preceded by their Model Number. Dan Hagedorn In his book, NA-16/AT-6/SNJ, tells of inspecting all the Aircraft History Cards, and the T-6J was not mentioned in any of them. The CCF-4 prefix was used in every case.

    Some authors claim that some aircraft went to USAF stocks as possibly T-6J-CC, etc, but USAF does not claim any T-6Hs or T-6Js. CCF-built aircraft were vastly different than the T-6G and never inventoried. Canadian authors who claim a T-6J was built and issued to USAF lack documentation and need to provide NAA Model and Job Numbers along with valid NAA c/ns, not USAF s/ns that were used for accounting and control purposes for countries that got Harvard 4s. If they knew anything about how USAF would have supported the aircraft with parts, etc, they would know that USAF would not have mixed Harvard CCF-4s and T-6Gs. They were not the same planes and never will be. (— Bill Todd 3/23/09)


AT-16 SEE Noorduyn.
AT-24, TB-25 SEE B-25.
  North American XB-21 [38-485] (North American via John K Lewis)
  North American XB-21 Nose mod at Wright Field (USAF Museum)

B-21 "Dragon" (NA-21, -39) 1938 = AAF medium bomber. 6pCmwM rg; two 1200hp Wright R-1820; span: 95'0" length: 61'9" load: 8171# v: 220/190/x range: 1960 ceiling: 25,000'. $122,600; POP: 1 [38-485] as XB-21. "Dragon" was an unofficial title, with no appeal to the USAAC despite a second attempt the following year by Douglas to use it for their B-23.
  North American NA-40-1 [X14221] (North American)
  North American B-25 Straight-wing, narrow tails [40-2165] (North American)

B-25 Mitchell, AT-24, F-10 (NA-62) 1939 = Medium bomber honoring the name of USAS Genl William E "Billy" Mitchell. 3-6pCmwM rg; two 1100hp P&W R-1830 (repowered on factory model NA-40-2 with 1350hp Wright GR-2600); span: 67'7" length: 54'1"; ff (as NA-40-1):1/x/39 (p: Paul Balfour) [X14221]; ff (as B-25): 8/19/40. Design extensively modified as NA-62 after Wright Field testing and 1700hp R-2600s installed. POP: 24 as B-25 [40-2165/2188]. A total of 9,816 were delivered to USAAF, and about 2,000 more exported to Allied air services. USN version PBJ. The last, a TB-25, was finally retired from USAAF duty in Jan 1959.
  North American B-25A (North American)

B-25A (NA-62A) 1940 = Armor and self-sealing tanks; v: 315/262/90 range: 1350 ceiling: 27,000'. POP: 40 [40-2189/2228].

  North American B-25B [40-2321] (U S Navy)

B-25B (NA-62B) 1941 = Electric dorsal and ventral turrets. POP: 120 [40-2229/2242, -2244/2348], of which 23 to RAF/RAAF and a few to USSR. Used by the Doolittle Raiders for their historic Tokyo raid in Apr 1942.

  North American B-25C [41-12800] (USAAF)

B-25C (NA-82, -90, -93, -94) 1941 = Auto-pilot, engine mods; length: 52'11" load: 13,700# v: 284/233/105 range: 1500 ceiling: 21,200'. POP: 1,1619 [42-32233/32280, -32282/32383, -32389/32532, -53332/53493, -64502/64901]. NA-93 and -94 were exports to China and RAF, respectively.

  North American B-25D (NACA)

B-25D (NA-87, -100) 1942 = Same as B-25C, but built at Dallas TX. POP: 2,290 [41-29638/30847, 42-87113/87612, 43-3280/3869], included exports to Allied air arms. Photo-recon version as F-10.

XB-25E, -25F 1942 = De-icing experiments. POP: 1 each conversion from -25C with new s/n [43-32281] and [43-32282].

  North American B-25G Cannon installation (art: North American)

XB-25G 1942 = Army M-4 75mm cannon in nose. POP: 1 conversion from -25C with new s/n [43-32384].

  North American B-25G [42-65128] (North American)

B-25G (NA-96) 1942 = 4p production model with M-4 cannon; length: 51'0" v: 281/248/105 range: 1560 ceiling: 24,300'. POP: 405 [42-64902/65201, -64802/65201].

  North American B-25H (North American)

B-25H (NA-98) 1943 = 5p with T-13E1 75mm nose cannon and side machine gun blisters for ground attacks; length: 51'0" load: 16,072# v: 275/230/105 range: 1350 ceiling: 23,800'. POP: 1,000 [42-4105/5104].

  North American B-25J [43-4892] (North American)
  North American CB-25J [44-30476] (USAF)

B-25J (NA-108) 1943 = Glazed bombing station on initial production replaced by solid eight-gun nose; wing racks for rockets; length: 52'11" load: 15,520# v: 272/230/97 range: 1350 ceiling: 24,200'. Bomb load: 3000#. POP: 4,318 [43-3870/4104, -27473/28222, -35946/36245, 44-28711/31510, -86692/86897, 45-8801/8899].

F-10 1943 = Photo-recon conversion from B-25D. POP: 10.

TB-25, AT-24 1943 = Unarmed, stripped-down trainer conversions of B-25D, G, C, and J were first designated AT-24A, B, C, and D respectively, then redesignated TB-25D, G, C, and J, the last of which continued in service up to 1954. Between 1951-54, Hughes Aircraft Corp produced 117 TB-25K and 40 -25M as flying classrooms for their radar fire-control systems, and Hayes Aircraft Co produced 90 TB-L and 47 -25N pilot trainers.



Score: Axis 74, USAAF 0

The enemy, so to say, scored a singular victory on March 22-23, 1944, when 74 B-25s of the 340th Bomb Group on the ground at Pompeii Air Field, Italy, were damaged so badly that they had to be stricken from active records—14 more were less damaged and eventually repaired. An air raid? It could be called that. Mount Vesuvius erupted, spraying rocks and volcanic debris on the base, five miles away, accounting for more USAAF aircraft destroyed than in any single action by the Axis in WW2. 64 planes had been lost at Pearl Harbor on Dec 7, 1941, 60 on the Regensburg-Schweinfurt mission on Aug 17, 1943, and 54 in bombing Ploesti on Aug 1, 1943, so it was with concern that our troops heard Nazi broadcaster Axis Sally report that "the 340th was knocked out of the war" in "a clear sign that God had sided with the Axis." However, the 340th moved to Paestum, 40 miles away, was re-equipped and back in action five days later, and Vesuvius settled down to being its picturesque former self.

  North American XB-28 [40-3056] (USAF Museum)

B-28 (NA-63, -67) 1942 = Single-tail, high-altitude version of B-25. CmwM rg; two 2000hp P&W R-2800-11; span: 72'7" length: 56'5" load: 10,165# v: 372/255/86 range: 2040 ceiling: 34,600'; ff: 4/x/42. Pressurized cabin. POP: 2 [40-3056, -3058] as XB-28 and -28A, the latter with R-2800-27, crashed in a test flight; a third prototype was unbuilt. Project was cancelled when no particular need for such a plane was found.
B-45 Tornado - 3-4pCmwM rg; four 5200# GE J47; span: 89'1" length: 75'4" v: 575/455/x (data for B-45A); ff: 3/17/47 (p: George Krebs). First US production jet bomber.
  North American XB-45 [45-59479/59480] (North American)

XB-45 (NA-130) 1947 = 3p with 4000# GE TG180; v: 536. POP: 3 [45-59479/59481].

  North American B-45A [47-011]

B-45A (NA-147) 1948 = 4p. POP: 96 [47-001/097], the last one of which was a static test-frame.

DB-45A 19?? = Conversion of B-45A as guided missile director.

  North American JB-45A [47-096] (USAF Museum)
  North American JB-45C [48-009] (USAF Museum)

JB-45A, -45C 1950 = Engine test beds for Westinghouse and General Electric. POP: 1 each [47-096, 48-009] respectively.

TB-45A 19?? = Target tugs modified from B-45A. POP: 14.

B-45B - Project only, none built.

  North American B-45C [48-001]

B-45C (NA-153) 1950 = Four 5200# GE J47; span: 96'0" length: 75'11" load: 64,049# range: 1910 ceiling: 43,200'. POP: 10 [48-001/010].

DB-45C 19?? = Conversion of B-45A as guided missile director.

  North American RB-45C [48-024] (USAF)
  North American JRB-45C [48-017] (USAF Museum)

RB-45C, JRB-45C (NA-153) 1949 = Photo-recon. POP: 33 [48-011/043]. First production jet bomber, first jet aircraft to fly the Pacific nonstop (1952), first jet aircraft to be refueled in flight


  North American XB-70A [62-001] (NASA)
  North American XB-70A Last flight [62-207]

B-70 Valkyrie (NA-278 -286) 1964 = Supersonic strategic bomber. 4pClwM rg; six 31000# GE YN93 turbojets; span: 105'0" length: 196'0" v: 2224 range: 7600 ceiling: 73,980'. Projected ordnance load more than 20,000#. Stainless steel and magnesium construction. Canard "cobra on a box" project cost about $500 million; POP: 2 prototypes as XB-70A [62-001, -207]. The first retired in 1969 and acquired for display by USAF Museum; the second was destroyed in mid-air collision 6/8/66. NA-286 related to unbuilt third prototype.
BC-1, -2 - Redesign of BT-9 with new wing and tail design, metal-covered fuselage; became AT-6 in 1940.
  North American BC-1 (William T Larkins)
  North American Harvard (RCAF)

BC-1 (NA-26 -54) 1937 = 2pClwM; 600hp P&W R-1340; span: 43'0: length: 27'9" load: 1150# v: 217 range: 665 ceiling: 24,100'. POP: 1 prototype as NA-26, 41 production [37-416/456, -636/679, 38-356/447]. To RCAF as Harvard.

  North American BC-1A

BC-1A (NA-55) 1937 = Redesigned wingtips and rudder, non-geared engine. POP: 92 [39-798/856, 40-707/739], of which 1 modified with new (AT-6) center section as BC-1B, and 9 delivered as AT-6 [40-717/725].

BC-1B (BT-9A) 1937 = POP: 1.

  North American BC-2(North American)

BC-2 (NA-54) 1938 = BC-1 with design modifications. POP: 3 [38-448/450].


  North American BT-9 Lineup (Leslie Burgess coll)

BT-9 (NA-19) 1936 = 2pClwM; 400hp Wright R-975; span: 42'0" length: 27'7" load: 1157# v: 170/147/x range: 880; ff: 4/x/36. Based on NA-16 design. Evolved into BC-1 and, finally, AT-6. POP: 42 [36-028/069]. SEE ALSO BT-10 and -14. USN version NJ.
  North American BT-9A (NASA)

BT-9A (NA-19A) 1936 = Armed version for Reserve units. POP: 40 [36-088/127].

  North American BT-9B (NASA)

BT-9B (NA-23), -9D (NA-26) 1937 = POP: 117 [37-115/231], with 1 modified with new wings and tail as BT-9D in 1938.

  North American BT-9C (TKnL coll)

BT-9C (NA-29) 1937 = Armed version. POP: 67 [37-383/415], of which 1 modified as Y1BT-10.


  North American Y1BT-10 [37-383] (TKnL coll)

BT-10 (NA-29) 1938 = BT-9 repowered with 600hp P&W R-1340. POP: 1 conversion as Y1BT-10 [37-383].
  North American BT-14 (AETC)

BT-14 (NA-58) 1940 = Advanced BT-9 design with 450hp P&W R-985; span: 40'`0" length: 28'8" v: 180/147/x range: 750 ceiling: 21,650'. $20,000; POP: 285 [38-224/257, 40-1110/1360].
BT-14A 1940 = 400hp R-985. POP: 27 converted from BT-14.

  North American XBT-28 [48-1371] (North American)
  North American XT-28 [48-1372] (North American)

BT-28 aka XT-28 (NA-159) 1949 = Tri-gear USAF advanced trainer to replace AT-6; redesign of USN XSN2J-1 became T-28A. 2pClwM rg; 800hp Wright R-1300; v: 292/x/65 range: 925; ff: 9/26/49. Experimental speed brake. The first US military production tri-gear trainer. POP: 2 prototypes as XBT-28 [48-1731] and XT-28 [48-1732].
CA-17, CA-18 (Australia) 1945 = P-51 made in US and assembled from components by Commonwealth Aircraft in Australia. POP: 80 as CA-17 (Mustang XX) and 120 as CA-18 (Mustang XXI/XXII/XXIII).
F-6 Mustang SEE P-51.
F-86 SEE P-86
F-93 SEE P-86C.
F-95 1948 - Interim designation for F-86D.
F-100 Super Sabre - Swept-wing fighter-bomber, successor to F-86. 1pClwM rg; 11700# P&W J57-P-21; span: 37'0" length: 47'2" range: 800-1600 ceiling: 50,000'.
  YF-100A (USAF Museum)

YF-100A 1953 = 9700# J57; ff: 5/25/53 (p: George Welch). Set world speed record of 755.15mph on 10/29/53. POP: 2 [52-5754/5755].

  North American F-100A [53-1594] (North American)
  RF-100A [53-2600] (USAF Museum)

F-100A, RF-100A 1953 = First production; 11700# J57-P in the last 35 units; ff: 10/29/53. POP: 203, with some converted to RF-100A photo-recon.

F-100B 1956 - Not applied; extensively redesigned as F-107.

  North American F-100C USAF Thunderbirds (art: K O Eckland)

F-100C (NA-214, -217, -222) 1955 = In-flight refueling system; ff: 1/17/55. Set first world speed record to exceed Mach 1 on 8/20/55 (822.135mph). POP: 476.

  TF-100C [54-1960] (USAF Museum)

TF-100C 1956 = Planned 2p trainer version modified from F-100C instead became prototype for F-100F. POP: 1 [54-1960].
  F-100D [55-2851] (North American)
  F-100D cockpit (North American)

F-100D (NA-223, -224, -235, -245) 1956 = Enlarged tail, landing flaps; supersonic autopilot, low-level bombing system; span: 38'10" load: 13,832# length: 47'2" v: 864/565/x range: 600 ceiling: 46,000'; ff: 1/24/56. POP: 1,274.

  F-100F [56-3752] (USAF)

F-100F (NA-234, -255, -261, -262) 1957 = 2p combat trainer; 10000# J57; span: 39'0" length: 50'0" range: 1000+; ff: 3/1/57. POP: 339.


  North American YF-107A [55-5120] (NASA) [55-5119] (North American)

F-107 (NA-212) 1956 = Extensive redesign of F-100B with a prominent VAID (Variable Area Inlet Duct) atop the fuselage. 1pClwM rg; 24500# P&W YJ75-P-9 turbojet; span: 36'7" length: 61'8" (?>60'10") v: 1300/700/x range: 1200 ceiling: 50,000'; ff: 9/10/56. Sidestick flight control system. POP: 3 as YF-107A [55-5118/5120]; production cancelled by USAF in favor of Republic F-105.
F-108 Rapier (NA-257) 1959 - 2p delta-wing design project cancelled.
FJ, F-1 Fury - Shipboard fighter. While FJ-1 was a specific straight-wing design, FJ-2 and up were actually USN versions of F-86 Sabre, even though the model name of "Fury" was a carry-over. FJ designation changed to F-1 in 1962.
  North American XFJ-1 (North American)

XFJ-1 (NA-134) 1946 = 1pClwM rg; 4000# Allison J35-A-2; span: 38'2" length: 34'5" load: 6272# v: 547/432/121 range: 1500 ceiling: 32,000'; ff: 11/27/1946. Looked like an overweight Sabre. POP: 3 prototypes [39053/39055].

  North American FJ-1 (USN)

FJ-1 (NA-141) 1947 = Initial straightwing version had disappointing performance and only 30 were built [120342/120371].

XFJ-2 (NA-179) 1952 = Similar to F-86E, with carrier arresting gear and folding wings, four 20mm cannon. 6100# GE J47-GE-2 turbojet; span: 37'1" length: 37'6" load: 4500# v: 690/x/120 range: 785 ceiling: 50,000'; ff: 2/19/52. POP: 2 [133754/133757].

  North American FJ-2 (North American)

FJ-2 (NA-181) 1952 = To USMC for shore-based operations; v: 676/518/x range: 990 ceiling: 41,700'. POP: 200 [131927/132226].

XFJ-2B (NA-185) 1951 = Armament reviised. POP: 1.
XFJ-3 (NA-196) 1952 = FJ-2 with a test instllation of J65-W-2. Not flown. POP: 1.

FJ-3, F-1C (NA-194, -215, -228) 1952 = Folding wings. 7200# Wright (Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire) J65; v: 681 range: 990; ff: 8/7/53. POP: 458 (?>389, 478) [135774/136162, 139210/139278, 141364/141443].

FJ-3D, -3D2 (DF-1C, -1D) 1960 = Air-to-surface and air-to-air missile testing.

FJ-3M, MF-1C 196? = Missile carrier with six Sidewinders.

XFJ-4 (NA-208) 1954 = Complete redesign of fuselage and wing, with 7800# J65-W-16A turbojet; span: 39'1" length: 37'6" ceiling: 46,800'. POP: 2 prototypes.
  North American FJ-4 (Boeing)

FJ-4, F-1E (NA-209, -220, 229) 1954 = Production model; length: 36'4" load: 4900# v: 677/534/x range: 2020 (combat radius: 800) ceiling: 46,800'. POP: 152 [139279/139323, 139424/139530] included the 2 prototypes above.
FJ-4F (NA-234, -248, -251) 1955 =Static trials with various rocket motors. POP: 2, did not fly.
FJ-4B, AF-1E (NA-244) 1956 = Close-support fighter. v: 715 range: 2700 ceiling: 45,000'; ff: 12/3/56. POP: 222 [139531/139555, 141444/141489, 143493/143643].

FJ-5 - USN version of F-107, minus the overhead duct, was a concept design at NAA Columbus, progressed only as far a two wind-tunnel models for testing at Ohio State Univ.
FS-1 Hoverbuggy 1965 = Open framework VTOL research vehicle, "Flight Simulator Number 1". Two 2200# GE YJ85 turbojets for lift, four engine bleed-air nozzles on outriggers for control; "span": 23'0" length: 36'0" load: 1550# v (max): 58 range 10. The ship had made 15 tethered and 185 free flights at altitudes up to 100' when the program was shut down in 1967.
  North American GA-38X 3-view (1934 Aircraft Year Book)

GA-38X 1932 = ClwM rg; three P&W Wasps; span: 76'6" length: 59'8" (?>43'1"). Tri-motor version of General Aviation GA-43; none was built.
GA-43 1934 (ATC 527) = Acquisition of rights from General Aviation made this ostensibly the first North American product. For data SEE General Aviation GA-43.
  North American L-17 (USAF)

L-17 (NA-154) 1947 = Military version of civil NAvion with 185hp Continental O-470. POP: 83 as L-17A [47-1297/1379], of which 47 to National Guard units. Production from 1948 on by Ryan Aircraft Co. Some converted to QL-17 target drones.
NOTE: The North American designation system can be quite confusing. Every airplane had two different designations, one model number (NA-) and one "charge number" for purposes of accountancy (na-), shown here in lower-case for clarity. BT-9s delivered to Argentina in 1937, for instance, had a model number NA-34 and a charge number na-16-4P. This holds true, as well, for the NA-44 group.

na-16 and -suffixes = Export. POP: 2,376. 4,003 more were also license-built in foreign countries.

na-16-1A (NA-32) 1938 = 550hp P&W R-1340. Fixed landing gear. POP: 1 to Australia.

  North American Harvard I RAF (North American)

na-16-1E (NA-49) 1938 = Same as BC-1. POP: 400 to RAF as Harvard I.

  North American Harvard I RCAF (North American)

na-16-1E (NA-61) 1939 = Same as BC-1. POP: 30 to RCAF as Harvard I.

  North American na-16-1GV

na-16-1GV (NA-45) 1938 = Same as BC-1. POP: 3 to Venezuela.

na-16-2A (NA-42) 1938 = Same as BT-9. POP: 2 to Honduras.

na-16-2H (NA-20) 1938 = Same as BT-9. POP: 1 to Honduras. Was civil [NC16025].

na-16-2H (NA-27) 1937 = Same as BC-1, but fixed gear. POP: 1 to Netherlands. Was civil [R17377] as NA-18.

na-16-2K (NA-33) 1938 = BC-1 with retracting gear. POP: 1 to Australia as a pattern aircraft for their Wirraway attack bomber.

na-16-3 (NA-71) 1940 = Same as AT-6, but with two guns. POP: 3 to Venezuela.

na-16-3C (NA-48) 1938 = Same as BC-1. POP: 15 to China.

na-16-4 (NA-41) 1938 = Same as BT-9C. POP: 35 to China.

na-16-4 (NA-46) 1939 = Same as BT-9C. POP: 12 to Brazil.

na-16-4 (NA-56) 1940 = Same as BC-1, but fixed gear. POP: 50 to China

  North American na-16-4M (North American)

na-16-4M (NA-31, -38) 1937 = Same aso BT-9B. POP: 2 to Sweden as pattern aircraft, the latter shipped unassembled.

na-16-4P (NA-34) 1937 = Same as BT-9. POP: 30 to Argentina.

  North American na-16-4R (North American)

na-16-4R (NA-37) 1937 = Same as BT-9. POP: 1 to Japan.

na-16-4RW (NA-47) 1938 = Same as BT-9. POP: 1 to Japan.

  North American NA-16 and -18 [X2080]

NA-16, -18 1934 (ATC 2-517) = 2pOlwM; 550hp Wright R-975 and 550hp P&W Wasp. POP: 2 civil prototypes [X2080, NR16025]. First airplane designed and built by North American and first of the BT-9/AT-6/SNJ-3 line, modified with canopied cockpits and faired gear as NA-18. Built in Maryland, but sent to California for modifications. First prototype went to Argentina.
NA-19 SEE BT-9. NA-22.
NA-20 1938 = Export as na-16-2H. POP: 1 to Honduras. Was civil [NC16025].
NA-21 SEE B-21.
  North American NA-22

NA-22 c.1936 = The ninth NA-19 (BT-9) with open cockpits. POP: 1, later modified back to BT-9 [36-36].
NA-26 1937 = NA-16 with retracting gear. Became prototype BC-1.
NA-27 1937 = Export as na-16-2H. Same as BC-1, but fixed gear. POP: 1 to Netherlands. Was civil [R17377] as NA-18.
NA-31 1937 = Export as na-16-4M. POP: 1 to Sweden.
NA-32 1938 = Export as na-16-1A. POP: 1 to Australia.
NA-33 1938 = Export as na-16-2K. POP: 1 to Australia as a pattern aircraft for their Wirraway.
  North American NA-34 Argentina (North American)

NA-34 1937 = na-16-4P export version for South America. POP: 30.
NA-35 SEE Vega 35.
NA-37 1937 = Export as na-16-4R. POP: 1 to Japan.
NA-38 1937 = Export as na-16-4M. POP: 1 to Sweden.
  North American NA-40B [X14221] (North American)

NA-40, -40B 1939 = 5pChwM rg; two 1100hp P&W R-1830-S6C3; span: 66'0" length: 48'3" load: 5780# v: 309/282/x range: 1200. Howard Evans, et al. Repowered with 1600hp Wright R-2600-A71 as NA-40B. POP: 1 [X14221]. Crashed during Wright Field tests, but the shoulder-wing, twin-tail, tri-gear design eventually led to B-25.
NA-41 1938 = Export as na-16-4. POP: 35 to China.
NA-42 1938 = Export as na-16-2A. POP: 2 to Honduras.
NA-44 1939 = 2pCM rg; 775hp Wright Cyclone; span: 43'0" length: 27'7" v: 250/225/x range: 1050. Prototype [NX18981], finally went to Canada. Recorded charge numbers shown as lower-case type.
na-44 (NA-44) 1940 = Export. POP: 1 to RCAF. See A-27.

na-44 (NA-69) 1940 = Export. POP: 10 to Siam. See A-27.

na-44 (NA-72) 1940 = Export. 600hp P&W R-1340. POP: 30 to Brazil. See A-27.

na-44 (NA-74) 1941 = Same as previous. POP: 12 to Chile.

NA-45 1938 = Exports as na-16-1GV. POP: 3 to Venezuela.
NA-46 1939 = Exports as na-16-4. POP: 12 to Brazil.
NA-47 1938 = Export as na-16-4RW. POP: 1 to Japan.
NA-48 1938 = Exports as na-16-3C. POP: 15 to China.
NA-49 1938 = Exports as na-16-1E. POP: 400 to RAF as Harvard I.
NA-50 SEE P-64.
NA-51 SEE O-47B.
NA-54 SEE BC-1.
NA-55 SEE BC-1A.
NA-56 1940 = Exports as na-16-4. Same as BC-1 with fixed gear. POP: 50 to China.
NA-57 1939 = Export. Similar to BT-9B. POP: 230 to France.
NA-58 SEE BT-14.
NA-59 SEE AT-6.
NA-61 1939 = Exports as na-16-1E. POP: 30 to RCAF as Harvard I.
NA-62 SEE B-25.
NA-63 SEE XB-28A.
NA-64 1940 = Export. Same as NA-57. POP: 111 to France, 119 to RCAF as Yale I.
NA-65 SEE SNJ-2.
NA-66 = Export AT-6. POP: 600 to RAF and RCAF as Harvard II.
NA-67 SEE XB-28A.
  North American NA-68 (North American)

NA-68 SEE P-64.
NA-69 1939 = Exports as na-44 for Siam. POP: 10 diverted to USAAC as A-27.
NA-71 1940 = AT-6 exports as na-16-3. POP: 3 to Venezuela.
NA-72 SEE A-27, na-44.
  North American NA-73X [NX19998]

NA-73X 1940 = 1pClwM rg; 1100hp Allison V-1710; span: 37'0" length: 32'2" load: 2250# v: 387/307/120 range: 350. Leland Atwood, Art Chester, James "Dutch" Kindelberger, Raymond Rice, Edgar Schmued. POP: 1 prototype for P-51 [NX19998]; ff: 10/26/40. Designed and built in only 117 days for British evaluation, who happily accepted the design and gave it the designation of "Mustang." First produced for USAAF as ground-support A-36, and only later did our military minds realize they had a real fighter in their stable.
NA-74 1940 = Armed AT-6 exports as na-44. POP: 12 to Chile.
NA-75 1940 = Export AT-6. POP: 100 to RCAF as Harvard II.
NA-76 1940 = Export AT-6. POP: 450 to RAF as Harvard II.
NA-77, -78 SEE AT-6A/SNJ-3.
NA-79 SEE SNJ-2.
NA-81 1940 = Export AT-6. POP: 125 to RAF and RCAF as Harvard II.
NA-82 SEE B-25C.
NA-83 1940 = Export P-51 (NA-73X). POP: 300 to RAF as Mustang 1.
NA-84 SEE AT-6B.
NA-87, -100 SEE B-25D.
NA-88 SEEAT-6C.
NA-90 1941 = Export B25C for Netherlands, impressed by USAAF. POP: 162.
NA-91 1941 = Export P-51. POP: 150 contracted by RAF as Mustang 1A, but a small number diverted to USAAF.
NA-93 SEE B-25C.
NA-94 SEE B-25C.
NA-100 - Unexplained re-use of B-25D model number for 66p Centuryliner commercial airliner project with two 10500# P&W JTF10A-6 turbojets, operating in the Mach 0.8 range. Planned for 1966 release; no info found.
NA-110 1942 = Unassembled P-51D exports. POP: 100 to Australia.
NA-119 1944 = Export AT-6D. POP: 81 to Brazil.
NA-135 1944 = Licensed production of Fairchild C-82N. POP: 3.
  North American NA-260 (Pacific Airmotive Corp)

NA-260 Nomad 1958 = Modification of T-28 to a general-purpose plane. POP: 1 prototype. Production by Pacific Airmotive as PAC Nomad (qv).
NA-300 SEE OV-10.
  North American NAvion [NC91103] (unknown source via E F Lipton)

NAvion 1946 (ATC 782) = 4pClwM rg; 185hp Continental E-185; span: 33'5" length: 27'8" load: 1016# v: 157/147/54 range: 530/980 with wing tanks ceiling: 15,000'. Edgar Schmued, Roy Liming. Embodied many design features of the parent P-51 Mustang, including the famed laminar-flow wing. $7,750, $8,990 in 1948; POP: 1,109, including 47 to USAF as L-17A. With a market slump and increased production costs (planned selling price of $6,000 was a bit unrealistic in the face of a construction cost nearly $18,000!), rights were sold in 1948 to Ryan Co, who used a lower-case "A" in the plane's name. SEE Dauby, Ryan Navion.
  North American NJ-1 [0947] (Harry Thorell via Archie Dean coll)

NJ (NA-28) 1937 = USN version of USAAC BT-9 with 600hp P&W R-1340. POP: 50 as NJ-1 [0910/0949]; the last one temporarily with 1000hp Ranger XV-770 as NJ-2.
NR-349 196? = Proposed A-5C variant; construction doubtful.
NR-356 196? = Proposed shipboard STOL/VTOL fighter; construction doubtful.
O-47 - Observation. 2pCmwM rg; Wright R-1820; span: 46'4" length: 33'7" load: 1656# v: 221/200/x range: 400 ceiling: 23,200'. Design originated at General Aviation Co in 1934. Observer's station in the belly, with windows below the wing root.
XO-47 (GA-15) General Aviation 1936 = 850hp R-1820. POP: 1 prototype [36-145], built at Dundalk MD.

  North American O-47A [37-260] (USAAC via AETC)

O-47A (NA-25, -60) 1937 = 975hp R-1820. POP: 164 [37-260/368, 38-271/325].

O-47B 1939 (NA-51) = 1060hp R-1820. POP: 74 [39-139/141].


North American-Rockwell OV-10 (USN)

OV-10 Bronco - Army light armed recon aircraft (LARA) and COIN fighter-observer. 2pChwM rg; two 750hp Garret-AiResearch T76-G-6 turboprops. Twin-booms, twin tails. As surplus in 1984, 6 OV-10As went to Forestry Service as fire spotters and cargo carriers.
YOV-10A (NA-300) 1965 = span: 30'0" length: 39'3" (?>40'0") load: 2724# v: 305 range: (COIN) 58 (ferry) 1,380 ceiling: 27,000'; ff: 7/16/65. POP: 7.

North American-Rockwell OV-10A High-visibility wing paint [55470] (USN)

  OV-10A (NA-300, -305, -311/312) 1967 = Longer wing, 1050hp T76-G-10 & -12; span: 40'0" v: 284/207/86 range: (COIN) 58 (normal) 500 ceiling: 25,900'; ff: 8/6/67. POP: 157 for USAF, 114 for USMC/USN. Production for US military ended in Apr 1969, but export production followed.

OV-10B, -10C 1973 = Export. POP: 18 OV-10B as unarmed target tugs to West Germany, 38 OV-10C to Thailand.

OV-10D 1972 = Conversions from OV-10A into night observation. POP: 17. Some updated with rear door in 1988 as USMC paratroop carriers.

OV-10E, -10F, -10G 1970-75 = Export. POP: 16 OV-10E to Venezuela, 12 OV-10F to Indonesia, 24 OV-10G to South Korea.


  North American F-51 Kelly Field mothballs being reconditioned for Korea at Glendale's Grand Central Aircraft Co, 1950 (Loran Smith)

P-51, F-6 Mustang (NA-73) 1940 = 1pClwM rg; 1150hp Allison V-1710-39; span: 37'0" length: 32'3" load: 2250# v: 387 range: 350 (data for P-51). Raymond Rice, Edgar Schmued, et al; ff (as NA-73X [NX19998]): 10/26/40 (p: Vance Breese), the design and manufacture of which was completed in only 117 days! POP total: 15,686, included 500 A-36As, 120 P-51Ds assembled in Australia (SEE CA-17), and 620 exports to RAF (total as USAAF/USAF P-51: 14,365). Exports also to various nations—SEE P-51D. In 1948, F designations became RF, and P became F. Military use continued into the Korean War and stateside National Guard units. SEE ALSO A-36, Trans-Florida.
  Early line-up Note plane at left with AAF star and RAF tailband (ad: North American Co)

From NA-73 to P-51 Mustang, the full series

Flying the P-51

  North American XP-51 [41-039] (USAF Museum)

XP-51 (NA-73) 1941 = 1100hp V-1710-39; span: 37'0" length: 32'3" load: 1687# v: 382/300/x range: 625 ceiling: 30,800'. POP: 2 from initial British production batch [41-038/039].

  North American Mustang I

P-51 (NA-91) 1941 = POP: 148 [41-37320/37351, -37353/37420, -37422/37469], of which 2 became test beds for Packard V-1650 as XP-51B (XP-78), and of which many early models became A-36A, plus 650 NA-73/NA-83 for RAF as Mustang I/IA (many were converted in England to Rolls-Royce Merlin).

  North American P-51-1 (North American Co)

P-51-1 (F-6A) 1942 = Armed recon adaptation with four wing cannon and two K-24 cameras. Briefly designated F-6A at first, the unique final designation signified a batch of 57 withdrawn from an RAF Mustang I contract for USAAF duty.
  North American P-51A [43-6246] (Peter M Bowers coll)
  North American P-51A on skis [43-6003] (USAF Museum)

P-51A (NA-99) 1942 = 1200hp V-1710-81. POP: 310 [43-6003/6312], of which 50 to RAF as Mustang II, and 35 modified as F-6B as armed photo-recons; 1 to USN for carrier trials [43-6xxx=57987].

  North American XP-51B (North American)

XP-51B (NA-101) 1942 = Two prototypes with 1300hp Packard-Merlin V-1650 converted from P-51; four-blade prop; v: 441. Originally designated XP-78 Apache [41-37352, -37421].

  North American P-51B [43-12102] (North American)

P-51B, ZF-51B (NA-102) 1942 = First production version with V-1650. POP: 1,988 [42-106429/106538, -106541/106978, 43-6313/7202, -12093/12492, -24752/24901], of which 275 to RAF as Mustang II, and 71 modified as F-6C; 1 modified as 2p trainer. Redesignated as ZF-51B in 1948.

  North American P-51C Mantz Bendix racer [NX1202] (Paul Mantz coll via K O Eckland coll)
  North American P-51C 336th FG, England [42-103603] (USAAF) and [42-103754]—note differences in tail and canopy

P-51C (NA-103) = 1720hp V-1650-87; load: 2815# v: 439/362/x range: 400 ceiling: 41,900'. POP: 1,750 [42-102979/103978, 43-24902/25251, 44-10753/11152], of which 636 to RAF as Mustang III, and 20 modified as F-6C.

  North American P-51D 374th FG, England [44-13626] (USAAF)
  North American P-51D USN carrier tester in original USAF markings [44-14017] (USN)
P-51D, F-51D (NA-104, -106, -109, -110, -122) 1944 = Dorsal fin, new bubble canopy, and 1490hp supercharged V-1650-7; load: 4475# v: 437/362/x range: 950 ceiling: 41,900'. Redesignated as F-51D in 1948. POP: 7,956 [42-106539/106540, 44-11153/11352, -12853/15752, -63160/64159, -77027/75026, -84390/84989, 45-11343/11742], of which 285 to RAF, 136 modified as F-6D photo recons, and 1 to USN for carrier trials on USS Shangri-La [44-14017=57987]. Additionally, 120 were built by Commonwealth Ltd in Australia. Exports during and after WW2 of new and surplus -51Ds went to Canada (100), Nationalist China (160), Dominican Republic (32), Guatemala, Haiti (6), Honduras, Indonesia, Israel (25), Italy (48), The Netherlands, Nicaragua, The Philippines, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden (140), Switzerland (100), and Uruguay.

TF-51D 1946 = Post-war 2p modification by TEMCO, with dual controls, large fin, elongated canopy. POP: ??.

TP-51D 1944 = 2p personnel transport. POP: 10 [44-84610/84611, 45-11443/11450]; several more were field-modified from P-51B/C/Ds [44-84945, et al].

TR-51D, TRF-51D 1948 = 2p trainer conversions of recon F-51D, plus 1 from F-6D.

P-51E - Not assigned; drawing-board only.

  North American XP-51F (USAF Museum)

XP-51F (NA-105) 1944 = Lightweight with low-drag canopy, 3-blade prop; V-1650-3; v: 466; ff: 2/14/44. Wing design went into P-51H. POP: 3 [43-43332/43334], of which 1 to RAF.

  North American XP-51G

XP-51G (NA-105) 1944 = Lightweight similar to P-51F but with 1500hp R-R Merlin RM-14 and five-blade prop; v: 472/315/100; ff: 8/9/44. POP: 2 [43-43335/43336].

  North American P-51H [44-64394] (William T Larkins)

P-51H, F-51H (NA-126) 1945 = 2220hp Packard Merlin V-1650-9; length: 33'4" v: 487/380/95 range: 850 ceiling: 41,600'. Designed specifically for Pacific theater; "Zero rail" rockets, six guns, 1000# bomb load. POP: 555 [44-64160/64714], of which 1 to RAF, and 1 to USN [44-64192=109064]. Redesignated as F-51H in 1948.

  North American XP-51J [44-76027] (USAAF)

XP-51J (NA-105) 1945 = 1720hp Allison V-1710-119; length: 32'11" v: 471/x/94 range: 650 ceiling: 43,700'; ff: 4/23/45. Lightweight, with low-drag cowling; fastest version made. POP: 2 [44-76027/76028].

  North American P-51K [44-11697] (USAAF)

P-51K (NA-111) 1945 = Similar to P-51D with change of prop. POP: 1,500 [44-11353/12852], of which 539 to RAF, and 163 modified as F-6K. Redesignated as F-51K in 1948.

P-51L (NA-129) - Project cancelled.

P-51M (NA-124) 1945 = Dallas-built version of P-51H. POP: 1 with V-1650-9A [45-11743].

Photo-recon conversions: POP: 55 F-6A from various P-51s; POP: 35 F-6B from P-51A; POP: 91 F-6C from P-51B/C; POP: 136 F-6D from P-51D; F-6E not assigned; POP: 163 F-6K from P-51K.


  North American P-64 [NX25607] (North American)

P-64 (NA-50, -68) 1940 = Export fighter version of AT-6. 1pClwM rg; 875hp Wright R-1820; span: 37'4" length: 27'11" (?>27'0") load: 1345# v: 270/235/71 range: 710 (?>965); ff: 9/1/40 (p: Lewis Waite). POP: 1 prototype for USAAF [NX25607].
  North American NA-50 (Sergio de la Puenta coll)

NA-50 1940 = POP: 7 to Peruvian Air Force.

  North American NA-68 (North American)
  North American P-64 [8300] (William T Larkins)

P-64 (NA-68) 1940 = POP: 6 for export to Siam as NA-68, but were instead impressed by USAAF and used as an advanced trainer despite the "Pursuit" designation. One survived the war and is now in the EAA collection [41-19085=NX37498=XBKUU=N68622].


P-78 = Initial designation for 2 Packard-Merlin-powered XP-51Bs.
P-82, F-82 Twin Mustang - The "two P-51s flying in very close formation" as a long-range escort fighter was really a separate new design, not just a mating of P-51s, as commonly assumed. It was also the last prop-driven fighter to be ordered into production by USAF. 2pClwM rg twin-fuselage; two 1600hp Allison V-1710; span: 51'3" length: 42'5" load: 9594# v: 461/285-300/x range: 2240 ceiling: 38,900' (data for F-82G). An F-82G was credited with downing the first enemy aircraft in the Korean War (p: Lt William Hudson), on 6/27/50 . Redesignated F-82 in June 1948.
  North American XP-82 [44-83887] (USAF)

XP-82 (NA-120) 1945 = Packard-Merlin V-1650-23/25 with opposite rotating props; ff: 4/15/45. POP: 2 [44-83886/83887].

  North American XP-82A [44-83888] (North American)

XP-82A (NA-120) 1945 = Allison V-1710-119. POP: 1 [44-83888].

  North American P-82B (Ivan Olander coll)

P-82B (NA-123) 1945 = Initial production. POP: 20 [44-65160/65179].

  North American P-82C [44-65169] (USAF)

P-82C, -82D (NA-123) 1946 = Night fighter conversions of P-82B with center-section APS-4 radar pod. POP: 1 of each [44-65169/65170].

  North American P-82E [46-258] (Boeing)

P-82E (NA-144) 1946 = Escort fighter. POP: 100 [46-255/354].

  North American P-82F [46-415] (USAF Museum)

P-82F (NA-149) 1946 = Night fighter. POP: 100 [46-405/495].

P-82G (NA-150) 1946 = All-weather night fighter with tracking radar; Allison V-1710-143. POP: 45 [46-355/383, -389-404].

  North American P-82H [46-377] (USAF Museum)

P-82H 1947 = Alaskan winterized conversions. POP: 5 F-82F [46-384/388] and 9 F-82G [46-496/504].


P-86, F-86 Sabre - 1pClwM rg. L P Greene et al. Originally designed with a standard wing, it became America's first swept-wing fighter and the first US fighter to exceed Mach 1 (albeit in a shallow dive). POP: SEE production batches for data.
  North American XP-86 [45-59597] (North American)
  North American XP-86 [45-59599] (North American)

XP-86 (NA-140) 1947 = 3750# Chevrolet-built Allison-GE J35-C-3; span: 37'1" length: 37'6"; ff: 10/1/47 (p: George Welch). POP: 3 [45-59597/59599], the second one was a static-test model.

  North American F-86A [49-1158 et al] (USAF)

P-86A (NA-151, -161) 1948 = Production model with 5200# J47-GE-1; load: 5862# v: 670/527/121 range: 1270 ceiling: 48,300'; ff: 5/18/48. Set world speed record of 670.981mph on 8/15/48. POP: 554. Redesignated as F-86A in June 1948. Third batch (333 planes) in 1949 as F-86A-5 had redesigned windshield, closed gun ports, wider cockpit.

DF-86A 1950 = Missle test directors. POP: a few various early models modified with relative electronics.

  North American RF-86A [6-196l] (USAF Museum)

RF-86A 19?? = Recon. No data.

P-86B (NA-152) - Production order for 188 planes was cancelled and redesignated as F-86A-5 in 1948.

  North American YF-93A [48-317] (Eaton Co Chronicles)

F-86C, YF-93A (NA-157) 1950 = Originally scheduled as P-86B in 1949, but redesigned so extensively that a new designation of YF-93A was assigned; ff: 1.25.50. 6250# P&W J48 with afterburner; span: 38'9" length: 44'1"; ff: 1/25/50. POP: 2 prototypes [48-317/318]; production order of 118 cancelled in favor of F-86D.

YF-86D (NA-164) 1949 = Nose radar; ff: 12/22/49 (p: George Welch). POP: 2.

  North American F-86D [50-546] (North American)

F-86D (NA-165, -173, -177, -190, -201) 1951 = All-weather interceptor with reshaped radar-nose, retracting rocket tray; length: 40'4". Set world speed records in Nov 1952 of 698.505mph (p: Capt Slade Nash) and July 1953 of 715.697mph (p: LtCol William F Barnes). Nicknamed "Sabre Dog" by pilots. POP: 2,504, of which 2 were converted to F-86K, and 981 to F-86L in 1956; SEE production batches for data. Prototypes flown as YF-95A.

  North American F-86E In Korea [51-2721] (USAF via AETC)
  Canadair F-86 Mark VI Sabre Dance (Jim Gregory via Richard Heeb coll)

F-86E (NA-170, -172) 1950 = Tail redesign, power-boost controls. POP: 336, plus 60 built by Canadair as Sabre Mk.III/IV.

Canadair photo shows a beautiful restoration of a surplused South African AF Sabrejet used the Holiday Inn Airshow team before it crashed at an air show at El Toro NAS (p: Jim Gregory).

  North American RF-86F [52-4808] (USAF Museum)
  North American TF-86F [52-5016] (North American)

F-86F, QF-86F, RF-86F, TF-86F (NA-172, -176, -191, -193, -202, -204, -206, -210, -227, -231, -238, -256) 1952 = 5970# J47, new leading edge and boundary layer fences, six nose guns; span: 37'1" length: 37'6" v: 690/603/x range: 1270 ceiling: 50,000'; ff: 3/19/52 (p: George Smith). POP: 2,540, of which 1 converted as RF-86F photo-recon and 2 as 2p TF-86F (NA-204, -216) trainer (ff: 1/5/54). Many later used as QF-86F targets and drones. NA-231, 238, and -256 were 300 exports to Japan.

F-86G 1951 = Provisional designation for engine test-bed with modified J47. POP: 1; production of 406 completed as F-86D.

YF-86H 1953 = 9300# GE YJ73; span: 39'1" length: 38'8" load: 8016# v: 692 range: 1040 ceiling: 49,000'; ff: 4/30/53 (p: Joe Lynch). POP: 2 prototypes [52-1975/1976].

  North American F-86H [53-1298] (USAF Museum)

F-86H (NA-187, -203) 1953 = Final production, with 8920# J73; ff: 9/4/53. POP: 473.

F-86J (NA-167) 1952 = Canadian-built production with 6000# Avro-Canada Orenda (Canadair CL-13). NAA installed the Orenda on one F-86A-5 pulled from their own production line as an experiment as prototype F-86J. POP: 60 planes for USAF were refitted with GE J47 and redesignated F-86E.

YF-86K 1954 (NA-205) = POP: 2 prototypes [52-3630, -3804].

  North American F-86K [54-1231] (North American)

F-86K (NA-213, -221, -232, -242) 1954 = Export version for NATO in 1955, with four 20mm nose cannon. POP: 341, plus those license-built by Fiat in Italy.

  North American F-86L [52-10143] (North American)

F-86L 1956 = F-86D with larger wings and upgraded electronics; span: 39'1" lngth: 40'3". POP: 981 conversions.


F-93 SEE F-86C


Nomad (NA-260) SEE T-28A
PBJ Mitchell - USN/USCG transfers of USAAF B-25 for use in mine-laying, harrassing night raids, and bombing and torpedoing ships in the Southwest Pacific theater.
PBJ-1C 1943 = POP: 50 ex-B-25Cs [34998/35047].

PBJ-1D 1943 = POP: 152 ex-B-25Ds [35048/35096, 35098/35193, 35196/35202].

PBJ-1G 194? = POP: 1 ex-B-25G [42-65031=35097].

  North American PBJ-1H (Natl Museum of Naval Aviation)

PBJ-1H 194? = POP: 248 ex-B-25Hs [35250/35297, 88872/89071].

PBJ-1J 194? = POP: 255 ex-B-25Js [35194/35195, 35203/35249, 35798/35920, 38980/39012, 64943/64992].


PJ, AF-15 - 4pChwMFb; two 420hp P&W R-1340 pushers; span: 74'2" length: 55'0" load: 4230#. Developed by Fokker/General Aviation as a Flying Life Boat (FLB) and delivered to USCG.
PJ-1 1932 = POP: 5 [251/255], redesignated [V112/115].

PJ-2 1933 = POP: 1 PJ-1 converted to tractor engines [V116].


RA-5C SEE A3J, A-5
Sabreliner, UTX (NA-246) 1958 (TC A2WE) = Trainer and utility in civil and military use. 6-10pClwM rg; two derated 2250# GE YJ85 turbojets; span: 44'6" length: 43'9" v: 575/450/99 range: 1380; ff: 8/16/58 (p: J O Roberts, Gage Mace). Wing design almost identical to F-86. POP: 1 company-funded prototype, originally as UTX [N4060K] (with no TC). Total Sabreliners, civil and military: 631, of which 325 were still active in mid-2000. SEE Sabreliner Corp entry for the current series.
265, 265-20, -30 1962 = USAF T-39A/-39B only, no commercial roles.

  North American Sabre 40 [N1WZ] (Eddie Coates)

265-40, Sabre 40 (NA-290) = Business jet; renamed Sabre Commander 40A in 1971.

265-50 196? = Test-bed for electronics equipment, identical to Sabreliner 40. POP: 1.

  North American Sabre 60 [N59K] (Eddie Coates)

265-60, Sabre 60 (NA-306) 1967 = Business jet; longer than 265-40; 3300# JT12A-8s. POP: 2 [N306NA, x].

  North American Sabre 65 [N7NR] (Eddie Coates)

265-65, Sabre 65 1968 = Business jet; supercritical wing, new engines.

265-70, Sabre 70 1969 = Business jet; taller cabin; ff: 12/4/69. 265-75, Sabre 75, 75A 1970 = Renamed 75A in 1971; 4315# CF700-20-2s; ff: 10/18/72.

265-80 1972 - Planned version of 265-75 with Garrett AiResearch ATF-3 turbofans, but not built.


SNJ - USN version of AT-6/BC-1 with similar data.
  North American SNJ-1 (North American)

SNJ-1 1937 = Army BC-1A with retractable gear and metal-covered fuselage. POP: 16 [1552/1567].

  North American SNJ-2 [2040]

SNJ-2 1940 = POP: 61 [2008/2043, 2548/2572].

  North American SNJ-3

SNJ-3 1941 = POP: 270 [6755/7024], plus 296 AT-6 obtained from USAAF [01771/01976, 05435/05526].

SNJ-3C 194? = Deck-landing trainer. POP: 55 converted from SNJ-3.
  North American SNJ-4

SNJ-4 (NA-88) 1942 = Same as USAAF AT-6C. POP: 2,400 [05527/05674, 09817/10316, 26427/27851, 51350/51676].
SNJ-4C 1942 = Deck-landing trainer. POP: 85 converted from SNJ-4.
  North American SNJ-5 [84968] (North American)

SNJ-5 (NA-88) 1943 = USAAF AT-6D transferred to USN. POP: 1,573 [43638/44037, 51677/52049, 84819/85093, 90582/91101].
SNJ-5C 194? = Deck-landing trainer. POP: ??.
SNJ-6 1944 = From USAAF production of AT-6F. POP: 411 [111949/112359].

SNJ-7, -7B 1952 = Earlier models modernized to T-6G standards. SNJ-7B was an armed version.


SN2J (NA-142) 1946 = USN advanced trainer to replace SNJ. 2pClwM rg; 1100hp Wright R-1830; v: 308 range: 1600. Failed to earn a contract. POP: 2 prototypes as XSN2J-1 [121449/121450].
T-2 Buckeye (Rockwell ) 1958 = USN shipboard jet trainer, redesignated from T2J. 2pCmwM rg; two 2950# GE J85 turbojets; span: 38'1" (?>35'10") length: 38'7" v: 465 range: 960 ceiling: 25,000'. POP: 217 as T-2A..
  Rockwell-North American T-2B (Boeing Co)

T-2B, YT-2B (NA-280, -288, -291, -294, -310) 1962 = Two 3000# P&W J60-P turbojets; load: 3842# v: 540 ceiling: 44,000'; ff: 9/30/62. POP: 2 twin-engine conversions of T2J-1 as YT-2B; 97 T-2B [152382/152391, 152440/152475, 153538/153555, 155206/155238], the first two of which were converted from T-2A as prototypes.

T-2C, DT-2C (NA-307, -318, -332, -340) 1968 = Two 2950# GE J85; span: 38'8" length: 38'8" load: 5065# v: 521 range: 910. POP: 231 [155239/155241, 156686/156733, 157030/157065, 158310/158333, 158575/158610, 158876/158911, 159150/159173, 159704/159727]. DT-2C was a drone director conversion.

T-2D 1969 = Export. POP: 207.

T-2E 1969 = Export. POP: 40 to Greece.

T-2J 197? = Two 3400# Westinghouse J34; span: 36'0" length: 38'4" v: 494/417/67 range: 967. POP: ??.


T-6 Texan SEE AT-6.
  North American T-28 Assembly line 1950 (North American via K O Eckland coll)

T-28 Trojan - All-service trainer, COIN fighter. Replacement for AT-6/SNJ, redesignated from XBT-28/XT-28.
XT-28, XBT-28 (NA-159) 1949 = ff (as XBT-28): 9/26/49. POP: 2 prototypes [48-1371/1372].

  North American T-28A [52-1234] (Gene Palmer coll)
  North American T-28A Engine installation (North American via K O Eckland coll)

T-28A (NA-171, -174, -189, -218, -260) 1949 = 2pClwM rg; 800hp Wright R-1300; span: 40'1" length: 32'0" v: 283/190/x range: 1000. POP: 1,194 [49-1491/1756, 50-195/319, 51-3463/3796, -7482/7891, 52-1186/1242, -3497/3498], which included a number used by Army as photo-recons, and about 150 exports to South American countries, France, the Philippines, and South Korea. Licensed conversions by Nationalist China in Taiwan 1976-1981 as T-CH-1 with 1450hp Lycoming T-53L turboprop. NA-218 for 1 to Japan; NA-260 for 1 civil factory demonstrator as Nomad.

  North American T-28B (USN via K O Eckland coll)

T-28B (NA-199, -200, -219) 1953 = USN version with 1425hp Wright R-1820 and revised canopy and engine cowling; span: 40'7" length: 32'11" v: 346; ff: 4/6/53. POP: 489. Many were modified with strengthened wings to carry gun pods or rocket pylons for use in Vietnam by South Vietnam AF and Royal Thai AF.

T-28C (NA-225, -226, -252, -307) 1955 = USN carrier trainer with tail hook, modified landing gear, underwing guns; v: 343 range: 860. POP: 299.

T-28D 1962 = COIN fighter with armored headrests; span: 40'1" length: 32'10" load: 1867# v: 345/230/x range: 1184 ceiling: 16,500'. POP: 321 conversions from T-28A and -28B. Many exports to Congo, South Vietnam and other Southeast Asia countries, the Philippines, and South American countries.

AT-28D 1963 = Ejection seats; conversions of T-28A by Fairchild Corp. POP: 72.

DT-28D 1962 = USN drone controller. POP: 6 modified from T-28B.

RT-28D 1962 = Photo-recon version.

YAT-28E (NA-284) 1963 = T-28A with modified nose for 2445hp Lycoming YT-55L turboprop and 11'6" prop; v: 360/276/x range: 2760; ff: 2/15/63. POP: 3, the last of which had dual controls.

T-28 Nomad SEE NA-260 and PAC Nomad.

T-28S - Licensed French conversions of stored USAF T-28As as Fennec; 1425hp Wright R-1820 (surplus B-17 engine conversions by Pacific Airmotive). POP: 144 conversions.


T-6 SEE AT-6.
T-39, T3J - USAF and USN version of Sabreliner.
  North American T-39A [62-4478] (USAF Museum)
  North American CT-39 [61-0639] (USAF ACC)

T-39A, CT-39A (NA-265, -270, -276) 1960 = USAF production model with two 3000# P&W J60-3A turbojets; load: 8460# v: 595/452/x range: 1725 ceiling: 39,000'. POP: 145 (?>143) [59-2868/2874, 60-3478/3508, 61-0634/0685, 62-4448/4502]. Most converted to CT-39A, 1 to GCT-39A [60-3503].

T-39B (NA-265-20) 1961 = USAF all-weather search and range radar. POP: 4 [60-3474/3477], plus 6 modifications of T-39A.

T-39C - Planned SAC trainer, never built.

T-39D, T3J-1 (NA-265-30) 1963 = USN version of T-39A. POP: 42 [150542/150551, 150969/150992, 151336/151347]. Originally designated T3J-1.

CT-39E, VT-39E (NA-265-40) (NA Rockwell ) 1967 = USN tactical support version, also commercial Sabre 40, initially designated VT-39E. POP: 7 [157352/157354, 158380/158383].

T-39F (NA Rockwell ) 1968 = USAF electronic warfare version. POP: 3 converted -39As as trainers for F-105G Wild Weasel crews at Nellis AFB.

CT-39G (NA-265-60) (NA Rockwell ) 1967 = USN version of commercial Sabre 60. POP: 13 [158843/158844, 159361/159365, 160053/160058].

T-39N (Sabreliner ) 1990 = CT-39E purchased used by Sabreliner Corp and rebuilt/converted to USN Undergraduate Flight Officer Training configuration with F-16 nose radar. POP: 17 [N301NT/317NT=165509/165525].

All were owned and operated by civilians when Sabreliner bought them on the open market; I think many came from Mexico. They were of varying ages and conditions, and received complete overhauls and Service Life Extension kits as needed, disassembled pretty much all the way to perform the Navy mod, which was substantial. (— Alan Harris, Sabreliner Corp)


T2J Buckeye - USN jet trainer. 2pClwM rg. Redesignated as T-2 in 1962.
YT2J-1 (NA-249) 1958 = One 3400# Westinghouse J34; span: 36'0" length: 38'4" load: 3025# v: 566/486/86 range: 960. POP: 6 [144217/144222]. Became YT-2A.

  North American T2J-1 (North American)

T2J-1 (NA-253, -266) 1959 = Specs same as YT2J-1. POP: 211 [145996/146015, 147430/147530, 148150/148239]. Became T-2A.

YT2J-2 1962 = T2J-1 converted with two P&W J60; ff: 8/30/62. POP: 2. Became YT-2B.


T3J SEE T-39.
  North American X-15 [56-6670] (NASA Dryden)
  North American X-15A-2 [56-6671] (NASA Dryden)
  North American X-15A-3 [56-6673] (NASA)

X-15, -15A-2, -15A-3 (NA-240) 1959 = Air-launched, rocket-powered hypersonic research vehicle—dubbed "America's first reusable space-ship." 1pCmwM rg; two 6000# Reaction Motors XLR11, later two 57000# Thiokol XLR99; span: 22'0" length: (X-15) 50'0" (X-15A-2) 52'5" load: (X-15) 18,300# (X-15A-2) 37,800#; ff (glide): 6/8/59 (p: A Scott Crossfield), ff (powered): 9/17/59 (p: Crossfield). POP: 3 [56-6670/6672], of which 1 was converted to X-15A-2 with external fuel tanks in 1964 [56-6671]. Two glides and 198 powered flights through Oct 1968. Maximum speed: 4520 mph on 10/3/67. Maximum altitude: 314,750' on 7/17/62. An engine failure on 11/9/62 compelled NASA pilot Jack McKay to make an emergency landing at Mud Lake NV in [56-6671]. The landing gear collapsed and it flipped over on its back. McKay was promptly rescued by on-site USAF medics and eventually recovered to fly the X-15 again, but his injuries, more serious than at first thought, eventually forced his retirement from NASA. The plane was sent back to North American for extensive repairs and modifications, and returned to Edwards in Feb 1964 as X-15A-2, with a longer fuselage (52'5") and external fuel tanks. X-15A-3, [56-6673] suffered major control loss at 266,000' and entered a spin on 11/15/67, crashed on the Mojave Desert 3.6 miles NNE of Johannesburg and killed USAF test-pilot Maj Michael J Adams. A memorial was built near the crash site.

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